The Strengths Revolution’ weekly podcast show was launched on 22nd April 2014. Just go into iTunes Store, click the ‘Podcast’ link on the top menu, then put ‘The Strengths Revolution’ into the search box.

Listen, subscribe, and add a review if you feel able to. Remember… listening, downloading or subscribing to the show is FREE!

'Working with Strengths' was published in May 2014 as a comprehensive resource for reviewing the literature and reflecting on strengths-based practice as applied to people in contact with services, as well as the strengths-focused development of practitioners, teams and organisations. It draws on the wider business literature as well as health and social care references to broaden the applicability of the ideas.

'Risk Decision-Making' was published in 2013 to help shift the focus from a tick-box culture to the realities of what good practice should be about. The manual and cd-rom provide the resources that should engage senior management in organisations, as well as the practitioners and multidisciplinary teams.

June 2007 saw the publication of the Working With Risk Trainers Manual and Practitioner Manual through Pavilion Publishing. The Trainers Manual provides a flexible two-day training programme, with the option of using any of the individual sessions as stand-alone training resources. The Practitioner Manual provides a set of practice-based risk tools with supporting guidance on how and when to use each. These materials also aim to discuss some of the wider risk issues and identify a key part of current research and literature. The practice-based tools are also supported by completed case examples.

To make contact either send me a message via the 'Contact Me' form or (if it's urgent) you can call me on 07733 105264.

Practice Based Evidence commenced business in October 2001. Promoting the value of the messages from service users, carers and practitioners experiences. These are often marginalised by the emphasis placed on research.


 

Twitter
  • The Art of Co-ordinating Care: A Handbook of Best Practice for Everyone Involved in Care and Support
    The Art of Co-ordinating Care: A Handbook of Best Practice for Everyone Involved in Care and Support

    Jointly written by Practice Based Evidence & ARW, this resource is of importance to everyone in mental health, social care and learning disability services, including primary care.

  • Assertive Outreach: A Strengths Approach to Policy and Practice
    Assertive Outreach: A Strengths Approach to Policy and Practice

    Primarily aimed at developing assertive outreach, but its focus on a strengths approach is applicable to all parts of the mental health system.

Entries in practice development (4)

Sunday
Sep212014

Creative Best Practice (a four-part trilogy!?)

Working as a case manager I am fully aware of the importance of skillful care coordination for the most successful clinical and social outcomes for people needing health and social care services. This is also why I published 'The Art of Coordinating Care' in 2009, to promote a values-based approach to the creative thinking required in this role.

Contact with different types of teams reinforces my appreciation of the need to carefully consider how we assess, manage and take risks for positive outcomes... in our own lives as well as our work with others. This is also why I published 'Risk Decision-Making' in 2013 as guidance for promoting best practice in making carefully reasoned and defensible risk decisions.

Working with people in teams, in organisations, and with those in need of services has reinforced my long-standing belief in the importance of developing strengths rather than overly focusing on fixing weaknesses. This is also why I published 'Working with Strengths' in 2014 to draw together the evidence, influences and guidance for keeping us focused on excellence rather than driving mediocrity. 

The weekly podcast show 'The Strengths Revolution' commenced in April 2014 to reinforce all of the above messages about genuine strengths-based person-centred ways of working and being. Creative coaching and practice development is also available through the Practice Based Evidence consultancy.

Sunday
Nov042012

Does the whole picture fit together?

This question captures the meaning of ‘care coordination’. Are all the elements coming together in a coordinated sequence or pattern? It is a question that we apply to many aspects of our daily lives. We ask it, for example, about the colour schemes and fittings of interior design; the layout of an exhibition or gallery; the clothing we wear in particular situations. Simplicity and straight lines in a map or set of instructions often seem to help us to understand what we are doing, where we are going and how we can get there more easily. Complex pictures and plans might please people who enjoy the challenge of working out puzzles rather than having the solution given to them but, depending on how much time you have and what kind of person you are, high levels of complexity may serve only to frustrate you and turn you off.
 
The degree of creativity experienced in the smallest to the most complex of mental health tasks will largely be influenced by the attitudes, feelings and personal values that are in play at the time. For example, the simple task of arranging an appointment, and then attending it, might just be part of what a particular person does, and they might do it methodically, with little or no thought. But even a simple task like this can be subject to enormous influences, such as the availability of rooms, effective computer systems, clarity of communication, motivation to attend and transport on the day. Failure to meet the appointment, for whatever reason, has the potential to cause frustrations, fuelling deeper tensions and attributions of blame. But the successful completion of a simple task like this rarely generates the positive feelings that perhaps it deserves. Not all appointments and methods of support are creative, passionate and artful events; but the message is that we need to be more reflective about the smaller details if we are to derive more pleasure from our work routines. This message applies to all practitioners involved in care and support, as the care coordinator occupies a role of supervising the whole picture, not painting the whole picture alone!
 
Successfully coordinated care and support can be a great source of satisfaction and pleasure for providers and receivers alike. See the ‘Art of Coordinating Care’ manual for a detailed approach to capturing the creativity in the role.

Tuesday
Feb282012

Reflective Practice - Re-connecting with a lost art might ignite a revolution in training

Excerpt: Service users and carers are likely to benefit most when they are served by a workforce that is motivated and enthusiastic about its work, that recognizes and works to its strengths, that feels supported, and is able to reflect on practice as an on-going function of its own development. Within this picture training as a function has an important role to play, but can easily become a wasted resource if it is poorly focused and lacks clarity of purpose. Furthermore, service users and carers possess invaluable experiences and skills that can contribute to the development of the workforce. So, why does it so often feel like reflective practice and genuine involvement are lofty ideals belonging to a parallel universe?

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Tuesday
Oct042011

Implementing good practice across an organization  

The Practice Based Evidence consultancy has been engaged across 2010-11 by Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust (formerly Hampshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust) to design and deliver a programme of practice development to focus on good practice in working with risk. This post outlines the three phases of work we will be carrying out for them.

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